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The Blackhawk War

BY HENRY LITTLE, 1875

In due time the'"battalion" arrived at the headquarters at the big Island on Big Prairie Ronde. The Grand Army organized. There were assembled all the military strength between Gull Prairie on the north, and White Pigeon on the south. That vast host, numbering between one and two hundred, (being the. same more or less), were consolidated into one grand army. After perfecting the organization of the Grand Army of the Peninsula, it was marched and countermarched, and trained and drilled and inducted into those great and marvelous secrets appertaining to the high and glorious profession of arms. It was truly wonderful to behold how quickly raw, green materials were transformed into ripe, polished soldiers. As was to be expected, the boys were amazingly "taken up" with their new vocation. They found it differed very widely from the old, dull, monotonous round of farm drudgery, much of which had been associated with the "birch" in early life. Some of them were so much carried away with its attractions, that they talked about enlisting in the regular service. They also became so patriotic that they. talked about the American Eagle, and the "Dear Old Flag, " and American liberty. They could almost say as did Patrick Henry: "Give me liberty, or give me death!"
THE GRAND ARMY DISBANDED.
After the Grand Army of the Peninsula had been thus delightfully and profitably employed about eight or ten days, the men were, much to their disappointment and chagrin, dismissed with permission to return to their homes.

Michigan


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