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TERRITORIAL ROAD

RECOLLECTIONS OF THE "OLD TERRITORIAL ROAD" AND ITS TAVERNS

Beyond this some short distance we came to "Tonguish Plains, " named thus after an old Indian chief, but who was always called "old Toga, " and the plains Toga's Plains. We shall have something to say of this old chief at another time. Some five miles further brought us to Plymouth. The road had been along the Rouge—that laziest of all streams—most of the way. Leaving Plymouth, then on the third day's journey the common phrase that "every mile was an inn, " if not verified, was often brought to mind, as we soon came to Crane's tavern, and not far from this was Jackson Freeman's inn, well known in the early days; and some seven miles from Plymouth was Esquire Pray's tavern, so long and widely known on this road. Five miles further in a south-westerly direction brought us to Dixborough, which was twelve miles from Plymouth. The founder of the huddle of houses was Captain John Dix, from whom the place received its name.. He was from Boston, and had been a West India sea captain. He owned a farm here, had built the first grist and saw-mill, and a store, all of which were of untold benefit to the new settlement for many miles around. When the Texas excitement broke out, Captain Dix sold out and went to the Lone Star State. We stayed at Dixborough all night. The tavern, I think, was a rude frame structure. The landlord's name 1 have forgotten; but I shall never forget our stopping at his tavern. It was crowded with emigrants. After supper, on going into' the bar-room, we found that crowded also.

Michigan


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