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EARLY SETTLEMENT OF SOUTHWESTERN MICHIGAN

BY A. B. COPLEY.
June 7, 1882.

The mission was quite successful with the exception of some privations and suffering for provisions the first eighteen months. Other teachers and assistants were added' from time to time as needed; improvements were made in cultivation of the soil. Two hundred acres in crops, and several hundred peach trees, and some apple trees, nine hundred bushels of corn, and three hundred bushels of wheat were grown in 1825. A flouring mill was erected that year to run by horse power; the stones being made from boulders near the mission (previously they had used a hand mill), being the first power mill within a long distance. These stones are, at this writing, relies in the Berrien Pioneer museum. The mission was closed mainly in September, 1830, owing to the influence exerted by. bad whites who for gain furnished the Indians with whisky, reducing them to poverty and destitution, inciting them to quarrels, murders, neglect of business— in short, depriving them of everything of value. Mr. McCoy and teacher labored in vain to stay their downward career, and it was through their advice and influence that they were finally removed to the Indian territory, now Kansas. Through the influence of Mr. McCoy at a treaty held upon the Wabash September 15th, 1826, with the Pottawattomies, there was granted to 58 scholars of Indian descent in the Carey mission school on the St. Joseph, to be selected under his direction, one quarter section of land each, and $500 worth of goods for said pupils.

MICHIGAN


Page 7


 


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