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EARLY SETTLEMENT OF SOUTHWESTERN MICHIGAN

BY A. B. COPLEY.
June 7, 1882.

There are accounts with doctors, bakers, tailors, sales of cattle, one cow, one calf, 3 large hogs, £550 sterling; butter, £2 10 s.; one cow, £100; another item for 377 boards, as if there were a saw-mill or pit saw in the settlement; charges for loaves of bread were quite common. In the war of 1812 English and American emissaries were early sent to the station to induce the Pottawattomies either to fight the Americans or remain neutral; this resulted in the killing of the English agent by the American, who was the nephew of the former, and who escaped punishment from friends of the murdered man for ten gallons of whisky. It does not seem that the station was closed during the war, which can only be accounted for on the supposition that the trader having an Indian wife and the station being a necessity to them, it escaped. In 1821 the title to a large portion of the lands was ceded to the United States by the Indians in southwestern Michigan. This treaty was signed at Chicago in August, 1821, on the part of the United States by Gen. Cass and Solomon Sibley, and on the part of the Indians by fifty-five chiefs and head men of the Pottawattomies. The considerations were $5, 000 yearly for twenty years, and $1, 000 annually for fifteen years, for a school teacher, farmer, blacksmith shop to be located on the south side of the St. Joseph river. It was also provided that a like establishment should be maintained on the Grand river among the Ottawas, except the time was limited to ten years.

MICHIGAN


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