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EARLY SETTLEMENT OF SOUTHWESTERN MICHIGAN

BY A. B. COPLEY.
June 7, 1882.

Daniel—then a mere boy of 12— was allowed to accompany them. They constructed their own boat (an open batteau) at lower Sandusky, naming it the "Saginaw Hunter, " and started in April, stopping first at Monroe, and then at Detroit, where Daniel well remembers seeing the naked chimneys standing on the Canadian side, as monuments of the destruction caused by the war of 1812 and 1814. As they passed the beautiful islands of the Detroit river, its waters teeming with fish, its banks lined with the forests just leafing out and as yet undisturbed by the woodman's ax, a view was presented as of a beautiful mirror in a frame of green. The- scene was one of peculiar grandeur and produced an impression on the minds of our pioneer voyagers never to be forgotten. Landing at James Abbot's dock, foot of Woodward avenue, they remained several days. Mr. Harrington, Sr., called upon General Cass, then governor of the territory, and was by him advised to wait until fall before proceeding on their journey, as a treaty was about to be made with the Indians, which would secure to them better chances of friendly treatment. The steamer "Walk-in-the-Water, " the first to ply on the western lakes, was inspected by the party as she lay at Wing's dock, above Woodward avenue. At this time there were less than half a dozen brick houses in Detroit; Gov. Hull's which stood on the present site of the Biddle House, being the most imposing structure of all.

MICHIGAN


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