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Michigan State Agricultural College

BY PRESIDENT ABBOT

The several States have, of course, organized their college after their own plan; but a curiosity naturally attached to the college that began the untried system of agricultural education upon a farm, and in some respects more especially in the working of compulsory manual labor, we have been acknowledged to be more successful than most other colleges, although the wisdom of requiring manual labor is by no means generally conceded. It is a peculiarity of the educational history of Michigan that from the first its laws recognize the dependence of agriculture upon science, and the consequent claims of the art to a place in any full educational scheme. It is not, indeed, directly recognized in that oldest law, the quaint law of 1817, when the governor and judges, in whom the administration of the Territory
Hon. C. J. Monroe.
resided, ordained the establishment of a catholepistemiad, or university of Michigania. Yet this was to have a didaxia of catholepistemia, or universal science. But when the University of Michigan was established in 1837, and branches provided for in different parts of the State, not more than one to each county, it was distinctly provided that "in each branch of the University there shall be a department of agriculture, with competent instructors -in the theory of agriculture, including vegetable physiology and agriculture chemistry, and experimental and practical farming and agriculture. "

Michigan State


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