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INCIDENTS IN THE EARLY HISTORY OF THE SAGINAW VALLEY

BY JUDGE ALBERT MILLER

The second night brought us to the mouth of the Saginaw river, where I fed the hay brought from Saginaw. The third day, just before night, I reached the rushes, where the cattle had such a feast as they never had before. The rushes were of the jointed variety, such as I used to gather when a boy for my mother to scour her tinware with. The growth commenced in the timber near the prairie and extended over a large tract of country; they stood thick on the ground and were about three feet high.
Four or five years ago I visited the locality where I wintered the stock there was but little of the land under cultivation, but not a single blade the variety of rushes that grew there so abundantly fifty years ago was to be seen.
After getting the stock located on their feeding ground we built a round shanty of logs to shelter the men while attending it. I left two men in charge, with orders to be among the cattle and horses every day to prevent their getting wild and to see that none strayed away. I visited the camp once a week to carry camp supplies for the men and salt for the cattle. My route was along the whole length of the Saginaw river, then across the head of the bay to the mouth of the Quanicassee river, then up that river two or three miles to a point near where the shanty was located. On arriving at the feeding ground I would distribute the salt where the cattle could get it and climb on the roots of a fallen tree to avoid being trampled on, and then call the cattle.

Michigan


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