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INCIDENTS IN THE EARLY HISTORY OF THE SAGINAW VALLEY

BY JUDGE ALBERT MILLER

There was about half a mile of deep water on the prairie between where the stock was stationed and the timbered land. I mounted a horse and swam him across the space of water while my men followed with canoes, driving the stock after me. The water rose so that on the 1st of May, when the lease should commence, there was not a foot of dry land on the 800 acre farm. I informed Mr. Dorr of the situation and requested permission to give up the lease, which request he complied with, and directed me to deliver the possession of the stock to Gardner D. Williams, to be disposed of for his benefit. Some of the cattle were good beef when driven from the rushes. The stock was disposed of during the summer of 1836, some of the cattle being driven to Detroit for beef, and others scattered over Saginaw, Genesee and Oakland counties. The water continued, to rise until it was two feet deep around the house, which I abandoned when I commenced building the steam saw mill at Portsmouth, and no attempt has since been made to cultivate any portion of the land.
In recalling to mind these scenes and incidents of fifty years ago I am astonished that one person should have lived to see the great changes that have taken place. The river which then appeared so broad and majestic to the writer is now spanned by nine or ten bridges, and its width so contracted by docks and booms that there is hardly room for the vast commerce that floats on its waters.

Michigan


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