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THE EARLY HISTORY Of MICHIGAN

BY HON. EDWARD W. PECK


I was at the annual meeting of your society in June, 1886, and became a member. I listened with pleasure to the remarks of the members, the history of their experiences, their labor, trials, disappointments, and, as well, their successes. During your sessions, your then president extended an invitation to the members to write up and forward to the secretary any incidents of their personal history, or of the locality where they first settled in the state, or any other matters of history, either of local or general interest. I signed my name to a paper accepting the invitation of the president, without a moment's consideration, and probably unwisely; but now I think you will have to bear the infliction, and that you may take comfort and consolation in the thought that the invitation will not be repeated.
First, I must give you a few words of personal history. I am a descendant of William Peck, who was born in London, England, in 1601, and with his wife, and son Jeremiah came to America in 1637, settling in New Haven, Connecticut. The descendants of said William, brought down to 1877, the date of the publication of his book, numbered nearly 3,000, and are scattered over the United States, and some in foreign countries. My grandfather with six sons and four daughters, emigrated from Lyme, Connecticut, and settled in West Bloomfield, Ontario county, New York, in 1800. I was born March 19, 1807, and being the oldest son of the family, was early initiated into the mysteries and labors of farming. The labors of the farmer at that early day were vastly more severe than at the present. We had none of the labor saving machinery now in use. The mower, the reaper and binder, the cultivators, the threshing machine, were not then known, and the tools and implements of husbandry were of the roughest kind, and it is doubtful if any of the pioneers of the present day, have followed the wooden plow, which had a small point of iron or steel, or have threshed their wheat and other grain with a flail, and cleaned it in the wind.

MICHIGAN


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