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PORT HURON, MICHIGAN

BY MRS. B. C. FARRAND

At the conclusion of the luncheon the company were taken by the Lord Mayor into a reception room where Mr. Chesson stated he had been requested by the Aborigines' Protectior Society to express to Mr. Chase the great respect and regard which they enter tained towards him, extending over many years. They had watched his course with sympathy, he might say with veneration, because wherever he had gone he had remembered that he was an Indian, representing the inter ests of his people, his object being to excite sympathy for the red man in all the English towns in which he had been privileged to preach the gospel.
The Lord Mayor said he felt the greatest possible pleasure in welcoming Mr. Chase, and was glad to hear that he had been warmly received the day before by the Prince and Princess of Wales. Sir Charles Tupper said: "My Lord Mayor, I am much obliged by your kind invitation to meet my friend, Rev. Mr. Chase, whom I had the pleasure of receiving as long ago as 1870, when I occupied the position of the Privy Council of Canada. From that time I have followed his course with interest, and know that he is not only a respected Indian chief, but also a devoted missionary. Sir Charles also said: "There are 3,000 Indians in Ontario. They own 7,265 agricultural implements, 2,594 horses, and 10,560 other farm animals. They raised in 1884, 132,557 bushels of grain, 73,06 bushels of potatoes, and 5,392 tons of hay.
Rev. J. A. Bailey paid a high tribute to his old friend: "Wherever he went he was acceptable as a preacher, a speaker, and a kind hearted Christian gentleman. " Sir T. Fowell Buxton sympathized with these sentiments and expressed earnest desires for the health and happiness of Mr. Chase.
Since Mr. Chase's return to America he has again taken up his residence in Sarnia, and ministers at the altar of the English church, and also officiates at Kettle Point. A portion of his time is devoted to the temporal interests of his tribe, which, necessitates extended visits to the capital at Ottawa.
The number of Indians residing on the Sarnia reservation is now much, diminished; some have gone to Saugan, some to the Saginaws, some to Walpole Island, but all must return or forfeit their annuity after five years. About 200 are now on the reserve. With what happy interest must this native Indian pioneer missionary, now more than seventy years of age, so honored abroad, and so universally loved and respected at home, look upon the developments and achievements of his lifetime, upon both banks of the river St. Clair. And "what hath God wrought, " by the help of man, in the civilization and christianization of the aboriginal people as shown in this history of one Indian.

MICHIGAN


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