image
image

image
image
 

MICHIGAN FOOD & BEES

BY A. D. P. VAN BUREN

Salt was also often very scarce; at one time it was twenty-one dollars per barrel. Thomas Kewney's family went without a particle in their house for six months. We were told when we first came to this State that we would get the "Michigan appetite" after we had lived here a short time. We found this to be true. And when it did come, which was during the first year, it was ravenous. With this appetite pork and potatoes were dainties. We relished them, as such, for a good square meal: and when we got through with that, we had only to reverse the order and eat potatoes and pork for the richest dessert—such was the keenness and relishing power of our appetites. It seemed that all we labored for was—to get enough to eat. Fruitless toil, for we were hungry all the time. Mrs. Thomas Kewney and her daughter Ann, afterwards Mrs. Stevenson, came to visit us one afternoon. My mother was really puzzled to know what to get for supper, for we had no bread in the house, nor anything of which to make it; but like a good housewife she was fruitful in expedients. Looking over her store she found about two quarts of wheat, which she requested me to grind in the pepper-mill. This I did. She then took the unbolted flour, and of it made a shortcake for her company. We had an amusing time at table over our frugal repast, which consisted principally of this Grahamitish cake. Tea, coffee, sugar, and butter were rarely seen on the settler's table. An herb called the tea-weed, a kind of wild Bohea that grew in the woods, was used by some of the settlers. The leaves were steeped like our imported teas and the decoction was drank. But it was soon abandoned when the green or black teas could be had again. Crust coffee, or a coffee made from wheat or other grains browned, was in common use for drink at table. Our pioneer mothers and their daughters found many occasions when they could not enjoy the accustomed tete-a-tete with their lady visitors over cups of fragrant Young Hyson or Bohea.

Michigan


Page 3


 






If you find this information helpful please consider making a donation
Thank you
Thank you



image
image
image

Site Map | Chapter Index | MICHIGAN
State College | Alpena 2 3|Branch County | Quincy | Calhoun County | Eaton County | Detroit 1820 | Detroit 1838 | Grand Blanc | Indians | Water town | Misc|Michigan 1820 | Hillsdale College 2 | Horticulture |
image