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MICHIGAN FOOD & BEES

BY A. D. P. VAN BUREN

Work is only half the question. Rest and amusement is the other half. And this brings us to our subject—Amusement among the early settlers. That mankind must have recreation of some kind, is conceded. It seems to come as naturally as relaxation after labor, and you might as well attempt to argue away relaxation as a desire for amusements. It will come, you put it off for awhile, but it will eventually steal in, "like dozes in sermon time There were no members of the early settlement who felt too indifferent or too dignified to attend the social parties that were held in the settlers' low houses. But what were these parties, you ask. I will tell you. In the first place, there was the quilting frolic; the girls attending in the afternoon, the boys coming in the evening. Then there was the. frolic without the quilting which the girls and boys attended in the evening. The sport in both of these parties was usually begun by the play of "snap and catch 'em, " or some rhyming catch, as "Come Philander, let's be a marching, Every one his true love searching; " with other plays following; the programme being varied to suit the company These parties were often called "bussing bees, " because the kiss so often stole in during the various acts of the play, while every play was sure to em with a kiss. The music in these frolics was all vocal, consisting of marches songs, catches, or rhymes improvised for the occasion. Besides these, there was the frolic that began with the play and ended with the fiddle's "Putting life and mettle in their heels. "

Michigan


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