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FORTY YEARS AGO (1833)

BY REV. ELIJAH H. PILCHER

This district, which then was so wild and uncultivated, has become a very fruitful land. Churches lift their spires, and school-houses show their goodly proportions, villages and beautiful farms are there, and railways run in almost every direction, and the engine's whistle may be heard almost any hour of the day.
DETROIT.
Thus far I have neglected to say anything in regard to my connection with this immediate locality, and now shall say but a few words. It was my good fortune to be acquainted with five of the seven persons who constituted the first Protestant church ever organized in Michigan. They resided in Detroit and vicinity, but are now all dead. It was also my pleasure to have seen and to have entered the first Protestant church ever erected in Michigan. The church was organized in 1810—a Methodist church here in Detroit—and they erected a log church on the Rouge in 1818, and had a legal corporation. The church organization in 1810, in Detroit, is to be distinguished from the corporation known as the First Protestant Society, which was composed of members of all the different churches, and finally resolved itself into a Presbyterian organization. This society was organized August 5, 1816, under the guidance of Rev. John Monteith. It had been abandoned as a place of worship when I came here, and the brick one on the corner of State and Farrar streets had been erected. I have a cane manufactured out of the timber of that old log church.

MICHIGAN


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