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THE MICHIGAN AND OHIO BOUNDARY LINE

BY FRANK E. ROBSON ESQ.

Although the "war" was ended, the controversy was simply transferred and congress was now the battle ground. To enter into a discussion of the questions arising upon the proceedings in congress, and, in the state which led up to its admission, or to enter upon a full examination of the proceedings would be foreign to the purposes of this paper. I shall content myself with such reference to them as may explain the final settlement. The presidential election was at hand, and it was of the utmost importance to the party of General Jackson that the states of Ohio, Indiana and Illinois be conciliated and the differences regarding their northern boundaries be settled 'to their satisfaction. Actuated by this view of the situation, congress ' ended the controversy by act of June 15, 1836, which, among other things, gave to Ohio the northern boundary as claimed by that State, and after accepting the constitution of Michigan which had been adopted the previous year by the people, admitted the State with a proviso that the State should first assent by a convention of delegates elected for that purpose, to certain new boundaries proposed in the act.
These new boundaries gave Indiana and Ohio all that they had claimed, and gave Michigan in lieu thereof the larger part of what is now known as the upper peninsula. Governor Mason called an extra session of the legislature, and the excitement over the question of accepting the provisions of the proviso was intense,, and on the whole hostile to the action of congress, which was looked upon as a piece of robbery. The legislature directed a convention to meet at Ann Arbor on the fourth Monday in September. This convention refused to purchase admission on the terms offered by congress, which action very much disturbed the plans of leaders of the democratic party, and soon-various anonymous and semi-official expressions came from Washington to the effect that it would be for the best interests of the state and particularly the democratic party, that a different action be had and that it be taken immediately.

MICHIGAN


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