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Michigan

OAKLAND COUNTY

There were mighty hunters in those days. The necessities of their situation, the scantiness of their larder, and above all the innate love of woodcraft which drew many of the settlers to their new homes, made them skillful in the hunter's art. And game was plenty; the bear and wolf were frequently found, while all along the outlet of Walled lake was a paradise for deer, and from thence they ranged over all the adjacent country. But my young friends must not think they were as easy to kill as a wood chuck. Then, as now, they were sharp-eyed, quick-eared and light-footed. They generally saw you before you saw them. A whistle would draw your attention to a white spot of tail, instantly disappearing in the brushwood. A successful hunter must move stealthily—must have a true rifle, and the will and power to use it with instant and deadly effect. There were some who could not always do this. I have in my mind a story which I have often heard, and I will tell it to you as it was told to me, being careful that it lose nothing at my hands. One of the settlers, a rather slender young hunter—since rounded out into a portly, good-looking old gentleman—had a boarding place about a mile from his farm.

Oakland Co. Michigan


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