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MICHIGAN, MY MICHIGAN

MAJ. W. C. RANSOM, 1871

This pious duty discharged, they repaired to their firesides, where were assembled each family in its entirety, from helpless infancy to tottering age. Soon they were seated by the festive board, where tranquillity and turkey, politics and pies, books and butternuts, ruled the passing hour. As the sons of New England scattered from the old familiar hearth-trees to set up new altars in the rising empire of the distant west, it is not strange that they should sigh for the good old Forefathers' Day of yore, and that, acting upon the hint given them by the Sons of St. Andrew and St. George, New England societies were organized for the purpose of reuniting in fraternal bonds the scattered ranks of Vermont tin-pan peddlers, Connecticut wooden nutmeg dealers, and down east Sam Slicks, who, with a pine shingle in one hand and a big jack-knife in the other, were bound to whittle their way through the world. In the march of empire, New. England has been left far away towards the rising sun. It is rarely now that one of her true original "Yanks" finds himself this far away from clams, codfish, and chowder; for in the changes of time the female persuasion of that goodly land have come to so far outnumber the sterner sex, that they have insisted upon enforcing those regulations of the Japanese against emigration, which the latter people have but so recently discarded as unworthy our enlightened age. Thus while it happens that New England is doing but comparatively little in peopling this western world, it must not be forgotten that it was the blows of her industrious ax that opened up the vast forests of the northwest to civilization, and made the wilderness to blossom as the rose. Especially, my friends, was the noble State, whose admission into the federal union we have to-night met to commemorate, indebted for its subsequent prosperity to the large infusion of that New England element in its early population, and which, true to the training made necessary by the rocky and unfruitful region from which they had emigrated,

MY MICHIGAN


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