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Michigan

Mound Builders

about the middle of the last century;" and that the Tuteloes "are believed to have migrated from Virginia northward, to lands assigned them on the Susquehanna by the Six Nations; but very little is known of their early history and migrations." An interesting paper on the Tuteloes was read by the Rev. J. Anderson, before the American Philological Association, in July, 1871. Reporting Mr. H. Hale's discoveries, this assigns the Tuteloes to the Dakotan and not the Iroquois stock, and gives an account of Mr. Hale's visit to Nikungha, the last survivor of the tribe of the Tuteloes, and who has since died at the age of 106 years.
The establishment of the identity of the Tuetles with the Tuteloes, and their residence on these mounds and along the Detroit river, is not only an interesting addition to our local history, but is of special value in view of its tending to sustain Mr. Hale's opinion (opposed to the conclusions of others regarding the Dakotan migration) that "in former times the whole of what is now the central portion of the United States, from the Mississippi nearly to the Atlantic, was occupied by Dakotan tribes, who have been -cut up and gradually exterminated by the intrusive and more energetic Algonquins and Iroquois."

Michigan Mound Builders


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