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Michigan CHAPTER Nine

Final Success of the English

So the summer wore away with attack and counter attack, and no great success on either side. The besieged French in the citadel of Quebec were in real distress. The army was on short rations with no relief in sight. The hope of Montcalm was that the enemy would assault in force, in which case he felt sure of his repulse and in all probability a stunning defeat which would cause him to draw off his forces. The siege was beginning to drag and Wolfe saw that some new movement must be devised. In counsel with his officers a plan was proposed to transfer the attack to some point above the city. The argument was advanced that in this way Mont-calm's source of supplies would be cut off and he might be starved into surrender. On the 6th of September Wolfe discovered the cove which now bears his name, a narrow ravine which winds up the steep hill about two miles above the fortress. He saw that only an insignificant guard was stationed there, and that it was possible to land a force which could make its way to the top of the cliff before any serious effort could be made to stop it. Laying his plans well he guided his men to> the spot in the stillness of the night and before the French pickets fully realized what was going on a large force had scaled the cliff and formed in line upon the level plain above. When the pickets reported to Montcalm what had been done he was at first incredulous. But it soon appeared that the time for action had come. So quickly rallying his men from all quarters he pushed out upon the Plains of Abraham to meet the invading foe. The result is soon told. The clash of arms was a most desperate one. Both sides fought with consumate bravery. Wolfe was fatally wounded and died on the field. Montcalm was twice struck by bullets and died from his wounds a few days later. The French fled into the fortress leaving the English in possession of the field. Four days later the flag of England waved above the citadel of Quebec. During the summer of 1760, Montreal remained the last French stronghold in America. The Marquis de Vaudreuil, still governor, was there besieged by Amherst, Murray and Haviland and the English fleet. It held out for only a short time. On the 8th of September, 1760, it too capitulated and New France was removed from the map for all time.

Michigan


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