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Michigan Chapter Seven

Dangers Which Surrounded the New Settlements

The works were defended by three hundred men and our loss would have been great. Our Indians lost sixty men killed and wounded, thirty of whom were killed in the fort, and a Frenchman named Germain and five or six others were wounded with arrows. The enemy lost a thousand souls, men, women and children. "
So ended this episode, but it was only one of several of somewhat similar character, though it was more formidable and dangerous than others. The inhabitants of this region had the same experiences as those of New England through the proximity of treacherous and heartless savages. Dubuisson had the good luck to have the alliance of several friendly tribes who, according to his own report, bore the brunt of the fighting and among whom alone fatalities occurred. The savages who had their villages in the vicinity or who passed this way on their hunting trips were in an almost constant state of turmoil, owing to quarrels and jealousies among themselves. The most unremitting care and watchfulness on the part of the French were necessary to protect their lives. No one could say at what moment a feud might break out, or what influences were at work shaping trouble for the little settlement. This was especially a hardship to those who lived outside the palisades and who were undertaking to maintain themselves by agriculture. Their domestic animals might be driven off or slaughtered without a moment's warning. While working in the fields they were compelled to be watchful and, upon alarm, to betake themselves with their wives and children to the protection of the fort. No sooner was the affair above referred to over than rumors came of a fresh attack from the Kickapoos, who lived at the mouth of the Maumee.

Michigan


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