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Michigan Chapter Seven

Dangers Which Surrounded the New Settlements

The establishment would always prove a burden and useless to the kingdom. He finds no> good thing in it in any respect. From Detroit d'Aigrement proceeded to Michilimackinac, were he spent four days. This, he declares to be the advance post of all Canada; the most important, as well for its advantageous position, as for the commerce that might be made here. It is the rendezvous and highway of all the nations of Lake Superior and the entire upper country. The fish are good and very abundant. The land is not of the best, but the natives raise enough Indian corn for their own use and that of the traders. It is easy to see from this report the motives and feelings which inspired d'Aigrement. He was hostile to the colony at Detroit, and ready to lend his influence to its suppression. The effect of his accusations was offset to a great degree by Cadillac's statement in reply, as well as by the petition signed by all the residents of Detroit, sustaining their commandant, by the letters of Father Constantine, and by M. de Ramezay, governor of Montreal, who commended Cadillac in unequivocal terms. * The war between France and England had a most disastrous effect upon the colonies in America. Both nations tampered with the Indians and sought to win their support. This had a tendency to make the natives wavering and uncertain in their allegiance. They were naturally treacherous, suspicious of the motives and purposes of their white neighbors, and the latter suffered the unhappy results of this condition of affairs. Cadillac appears to have had the confidence and good will of the savages, but no sooner had he departed than troubles thickened for the dwellers at Fort Pontchartrain. Through the intrigues of the English the Iroquois planned to surprise and capture Detroit. This scheme was to be carried into effect through the Ottagamies and Mascoutins who dwelt in the Green Bay region. These were hereditary enemies of the Hurons, who supported the French interests and who formed considerable villages about the post at Detroit.

Michigan


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