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MICHIGAN CHAPTER 17

Close of the Revolution and Surrender of Michigan to the United States

Hence, the terms of the treaty not having been fully observed by the Americans, the British, on their part, were relieved from obligation. It was charged by the Americans that a number of negro slaves had been enticed away from their owners and carried off by British officers, in violation of the express provisions of the treaty. Other property was alleged to have been confiscated and smuggled out of the country. It is known that the official records of the post at Detroit were removed to Quebec and that they were not recovered until a half century later. These were some of the elements of the friction which developed. Claims and counter-claims were bandied back and forth between St. James and the capitol at Philadelphia. Some of them had the appearance of being merely subterfuge, an effort to kill time or to provoke controversy for the sake of controversy. It might be inferred from her conduct that Great Britain regretted having yielded in fixing the boundary line in such way as to give up to the United States the country northwest of the Ohio, and was now inclined to shape matters, if possible, for a re-opening of the treaty stipulations.
In 1787 an ordinance was enacted by congress organizing the territory northwest of the Ohio river. Under this organization General Arthur St. Clair was appointed governor. Though Michigan was included within the provisions of this ordinance, they could not at once be practically applied, owing to the fact that the country was still under British control. In 1792 Quebec was divided into Upper and Lower Canada, with the seat of government of the latter at Toronto, then known as York. Sir Guy Carleton as Lord Dorchester had again become Governor General of the whole province, with John Graves Simcoe Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada. The Quebec act, so far as related to this region, was repealed and all legislation under it was abrogated. Permanent courts were established in the regular way and a form of civil government was set up for the first time at Detroit and Michilimackinac.

MICHIGAN


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