image
image

image
image
 

MICHIGAN CHAPTER 16

Influx of Settlers

They had no inclination to meddle with the prerogatives of either. They were humble, docile, easy-going, contented. When the colors of France gave way to the red cross of St. George, they were equally loyal to the British crown. They had never been in the enjoyment of the civil rights of some other nationalities, which made British rule intolerable to the New Englanders. So they were contented to accept what they had and to plod along in their undemonstrative fashion, a little better in a physical sense, but no better in a political sense, than their ancestors in Picardy. These people made up the mass of the population. The new-comers to this region were too few in number, too diverse in nationality to organize anything like a community of interests, or to assert themselves in a way to influence their local government. There was never a town-meeting in old Detroit. Up to the final evacuation of the country, the British commander was the autocrat whose word was law and who controlled all affairs, civil as well as military. The people and their ways were not those of the dwellers upon the Atlantic seaboard. The men were brave enough and manly enough, but the spirit of rebellion had not been born in them.

MICHIGAN


Page 10


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
 






Please help us keep this site online and to continue to bring sites like this one.
Thank you



image
image
image

Site Map | Chapter Index | MICHIGAN
Saginaw ValleyII | Lucius Lyon | Michigan 1-5 | Michigan 6 | Michigan 7 | Michigan 8 | Michigan 9 | Michigan 19 | Michigan 11 | Michigan 12 | Michigan 13 | Michigan 14 | Michigan 15 | Michigan 16 | Michigan 17 |Indian Doctor | Reminiscences | 1787 | Questions | Settlement | Yerks
image