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MICHIGAN CHAPTER 15

Michigan Under British Rule

Alexander McKee, an Indian agent with a small detachment did make a descent into Kentucky. But the Indians were becoming timid or indifferent. They had a wholesome fear of Colonel Clark. They were upset by wild rumors of large forces of Americans being organized against them and marching unopposed in all directions. The Indian relishes a fight when he can get his adversary at a disadvantage; he has no appetite for a square stand-up contest of arms where the chances are anywhere near equal and where there is shooting by skilled marksmen. When there is business of this kind in prospect he prefers to sit down and think it over and to take plenty of time to consult the oracles. So the savage forces dwindled and imperceptibly vanished away into the forests. The British commander was left with only his handful of whites who were manifestly no match for the American forces. There was nothing to do but to retire. The governor was deeply chagrined over the outcome of the expedition and was disposed to blame the savages. But he was forced to admit that they had acted in their customary manner. He could only lament that his government was put to the expense of maintaining and fitting out such shameless and unreliable allies. So matters progressed from year to year. The story of one raid is the repetition of the story of another. The Indians under the instigation of the English harassed the American settlements and the latter defended themselves as best they could but were never able to undertake any successful reprisal which would end once for all such distressing conditions.
By June, 1782, news of the cessation of fighting between the British and colonial armies came to Detroit and it was evident that an era of peace was to fallow, De Peyster at once sent word to Captain Caldwell and to Brant and McKee who were stirring up matters in Kentucky and Ohio to stop hostilities, and with a few more skirmishes these bloody conflicts of arms came to an end. The doors of "Yankee Hall, " the military prison at Detroit were opened and De Peyster sent the captives to their homes. Some chose to remain and settle in Michigan. Among these were a number of Germans from Pennsylvania whose families came hither for permanent settlement.

MICHIGAN


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