image
image

image
image
 

MICHIGAN CHAPTER 13

Progress of the Colony Under the Improved Conditions

The more liberal minded took the position that however much the settlers might produce, they could not possibly supply every demand and that instead of narrowing the market, they would, in fact, enlarge it. It was this selfish spirit of treating the colonists as inferiors and subjects to be exploited merely as contributors to the greed of English merchants and manufacturers that had much to do with the revolt of the people of the Atlantic coast. The Lords of Trade deliberately set their faces against the encouragement of any enterprises "at the distance of above fifteen hundred miles from the sea, and upon places which, upon the fullest evidence are found to be utterly inaccessible to shipping, " on the ground that they would not produce returns sufficient to pay for the manufactures of Great Britain, and thus would be obliged to manufacture for themselves. They say that the present French inhabitants will raise enough provisions to supply the military posts, and that meets all the requirements. The navigation of the lakes was at this time very limited in extent. There were a few schooners, but the trade by water was mostly carried on in batteaux which were propelled by oarsmen. Governor Carleton issued an order, in consequence of the situation caused by the war of the revolution, that no> vessels are to navigate the lakes, except such as are armed and manned by the crown, the arms and ammunition of the trade to be put on board these armed vessels and no military stores, whether public or private property, to be suffered to go in open batteaux. It was, however, arranged that merchants should be permitted to ship goods and to take passage upon any vessel not in full employment in the king's service.
This restriction of navigation was thought to be essential to the safety of the lake posts in view of the troubles in which the thirteen colonies had involved the country. Though these troubles were of only remote interest to the people living in the lake region, we, nevertheless, perceive a faint echo in the efforts to prevent any possible aid and comfort to the rebels, and especially to hold the loyalty of the Indian tribes. This latter consideration was matter for earnest caution and delicate treatment on the part of the English officials. It needed but slight temptation to draw the savages into a warlike affair. Later, the English considered it to be their best policy to enlist the savages on their side and to incite them to attack the Americans.

MICHIGAN


Page 11


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
 


image



Thank you for visiting. If you have found the information here interesting please consider making a donation.


image
image
image

Site Map | Chapter Index | MICHIGAN
French Settlements | Banks | Education | Gratiat County| Garden Beds | Mound Builders | Mexico War | Oliver Williams | Goerge Bates
Able Bingham | Biograph |Methodist | Oakland County | Macomb Co. | St Joseph Co. | Tecumseh | Lenawee County | Jackson 2 3 4
image