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Michigan CHAPTER 10

Effect Upon the Indians of the Lake Region


THE treaty of Paris in 1763 put an end to the question whether Canada should be restored to France, as Breton and Nova Scotia had been previously restored. There was strong feeling on this question among the English colonies in America. A powerful party in England favored such restoration. But Pitt, though he had been out of office since the death of George II and the accession of George III in 1760, vigorously opposed it. He still had great influence and his councils prevailed. By the treaty the king of France renounced all pretensions to Nova Scotia, ceded Canada and its dependencies to England, together with Cape Breton and the islands and coasts in the vicinity of the river and Gulf of St. Lawrence. To avoid controversy a definite boundary line between the dominions of France and Great Britain on this continent east of the Mississippi river was described. This left to France a portion of Louisiana and adjacent coasts of the Gulf of Mexico. Lest she might be plundered of even this small remnant of her once vast possessions, she made haste to turn over her title to Spain.
However, the victorious Amherst did not wait for the negotiations in the capitals of France and England, but proceeded to the full occupancy of the western posts which had been held by the French. Three days after the capitulation of Montreal he despatched Major Robert Rogers with a suitable force to move on to Detroit and take command of that post, as well as all others in the vicinity.

Michigan


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