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MICHIGAN AS A PROVINCE 1 - 5


But they treated him well, banqueted and feasted him and made with him a treaty of peace. He journeyed southward to the country of the Illinois and afterward returned to Canada by the same route, arriving at Quebec late in the autumn of 1635. * Soon after his return Champlain died and this put an end for the time to his contemplated efforts at further exploration. He married the god-daughter of Champlain and settled down upon an estate. In 1642 he was accidentally drowned while on a trip from Quebec to Three Rivers.
In the summer of 1660 Father Rene Menard, a Jesuit missionary, started from the mission on Georgian bay on a voyage of exploration westward. At the Sault Ste Marie he procured a birch canoe and accompanied by a single Indian he coasted along the south shore of Lake Superior until he reached the head of Keweenaw bay. To this bay he gave the name of St. Theresa, because he discovered it on the anniversary of his patron saint, October 15. Here in the wilderness with only his Indian companion he spent the long dreary winter, suffering great hardship in the inhospitable climate, living in a hut of fir boughs, with insufficient food and finding little companionship among the savages. During his sojourn here he labored with great zeal to convert his wild neighbors, and felt encouraged to believe that he had accomplished some good.
In the spring he resumed his journey, going inland to visit the Hurons of that region. He passed to the westward entirely across the upper peninsula and across the boundary line into Wisconsin.

MICHIGAN


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