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Michigan

Jackson

It was the "rumors of war" and not the war itself which proved so disastrous, for of actual war in Michigan there was none. Aside from the check to immigration, the whole of the southern and western portion of the territory was for months kept in a continual state of suspense and alarm by the actual state of hostilities in Illinois, and the fears of a rising of the Indians. The slaughter of the women and children, the burning of the homestead, these were the dreaded scenes which such a war would witness, and it is not wonderful that the small and scattered settlements should feel the greatest alarm. Everywhere preparations were made for the emergency. Farmers were obliged to abandon their spring work, and instead of plowing and planting were summoned to meet with such arms as they could command, at some rendezvous, and then prepare by organization and drilling for the expected emergency. Men were called at a distance from home and kept for days, leaving, meanwhile, their families to suffer from the suspense and fright which the circumstances called forth.

Jackson
Section 2


Page 10


 






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