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Michigan

Jackson Mi.


The first settlement on the site of what is now the city of Jackson, by white people, was made in 1829. A portion of the ground had been occupied and cultivated by the Indians long anterior to the appearance,, of the white man. Corn, and probably other crops, had been raised on a clearing near where the Congregational church now stands. The site of Jackson was a favorite camping ground for the Indians, and a central point for their trails, leading to all parts of the Indian territory, prophetic, as it were, of the future in store for it, in becoming one of the principal railroad centers in the state. Some nine or more of these trails diverged from this place, among them the great Washtenaw, the, St. Joseph, and the Chicago trails, the marks of some of which are yet visible, and which, a few years since, could be distinctly traced for some , distance both east and west of the city. On the west bank of the river, where it was crossed by the great St. Joseph's trail, was an Indian burying ground, but there was no Indian village located within what are now the bounds of the city.

Jackson
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