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INDIAN SUPERSTITION

BY EPHRAIM S. WILLIAMS

I have stopped them and tried to induce them to return, and we would go with them; but no, it was the Mun-e-soos, and nothing would convince them differently, find away they would go frightened almost to death.
I have visited their deserted camps at such times, gathered up their effects that were left, and secured them in some one camp or lodge from the destruction of wild animals. After a time they would return and save what was left. During these times they were perfectly miserable, actually afraid of their own shadow. At other times, having a little bad luck in trapping or hunting, they would become excited, and often say game has been over and in their traps and they don't catch anything—have known them to go so far as to insist that a beaver or an otter has been in their traps and has gotten out, or ¦Was let out by the Mun-e-soos, or that their traps are bewitched or spell bound by the "bad Indians, " that their rifles have been charmed by the Mun-e-soos . and they can't kill anything. Then they must give a great feast and have the medicine man or conjurer, and through his wise and dark performances the harm is removed, and all is well again; traps and rifles do their duty, and "the poor beaver, otter, deer, bear, etc., again suffer, much to the profit of the traders and pleasure of the Indians. These things have been handed down for generations.
I have had them come frequently miles, bringing their rifles to me, asking me to examine and re-sight them, declaring the sights had been moved, and most instances they had (but by themselves in their fright). I always did, applied to, re-sight and try them until they would shoot correctly, and they would go away cheerful and thankful.

Michigan Indians


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