image
image

image
image
 

HISTORY OF HILLSDALE COLLEGE

BY HON. JOHN C. PATTERSON, 1883

The institution has had an annual attendance of over five hundred students since it opened its doors at Hillsdale, and over thirteen thousand different students have received instructions in its classic halls. Twenty-four foreign missionaries have here been educated. Many of the former students, urged on by the lessons of self reliance so forcibly imparted by precept and example, are winning success and taking prominent positions in life. Undoubtedly, Hillsdale College has imparted more instruction, developed more heads and hearts, and has accomplished a greater work in the educational field than any other American institution in the same length of time on the same amount of money.
CONCLUSION
Only three of the men who were present at the July meeting at Franklin in 1844, and took a part in giving the enterprise organic shape, are now living. Rev. Chauncey Reynolds, of Hillsdale, Rev. Laurens B. Potter, of Lansing, and Rev. Henry S. Limbocker, of Manhattan, Kansas, are the only survivors. The five delegates from Calhoun quarterly meeting, who were prepared in that conference to say by their votes that the denomination should have a school within the State, have passed over to the majority. In Assyria, Barry county, is the grave of Deacon Joseph S. Blaisdell. Deacon Heman Cowles and Thomas Dunton were buried at Battle Creek. Elder Samuel Whitcomb, the father of the-enterprise, and Elder Elijah Cook, his co-laborer, are buried on Cook's Prairie. By their side lies Hon. Daniel Dunakin, the friend and champion of the college. They sleep near the little church where the society, organized by them nearly half a century ago, meets for worship. These fathers of the enterprise "builded better than they knew. " Hillsdale College is their monument. Let the thousands of young men and young women— now scattered all over the world—who have received the benefits of Hillsdale College, cherish the memories of those benefactors. The history of this pioneer college demonstrates to the world that a denominational school, without interfering with our State university or impairing its usefulness, can exist in Michigan and do a great work.

EARLY MICHIGAN


Page 25


 






Please help us keep this site online and to continue to bring sites like this one.
Thank you



image
image
image

Site Map | Chapter Index | MICHIGAN
Saginaw ValleyII | Lucius Lyon | Michigan 1-5 | Michigan 6 | Michigan 7 | Michigan 8 | Michigan 9 | Michigan 19 | Michigan 11 | Michigan 12 | Michigan 13 | Michigan 14 | Michigan 15 | Michigan 16 | Michigan 17 |Indian Doctor | Reminiscences | 1787 | Questions | Settlement | Yerks
image