image
image

image
image
 

French in Michigan

French Settlements

Farming was superficial and not thorough, although gardening and fruit raising appear to have been more cared for. The land required little manuring, and raised good crops for many years in succession with no special care. Apples and pears were good and abundant. Peaches also were, in 1796, spoken of by Mr. Weld as of great excellence. Little mention is made of the smaller fruits, but cherries and currants were undoubtedly raised in many of the homesteads. There were several wind mills and numerous water mills all along the river near Detroit, most of which were grist mills. The lack of roads made the streams serve as common highways, and these mills were very accessible. One of the important industries was fishing, and white fish formed a valuable element in the provision market, fresh or dried and smoked. They were not in the earlier times put up in brine as they are now, and a slight salting was sufficient when they were smoked. Sugar was often used with or instead of salt in thus curing them.

Early Michigan


Page 25


 






Please help us keep this site online and to continue to bring sites like this one.
Thank you



image
image
image

Site Map | Chapter Index | MICHIGAN
Saginaw ValleyII | Lucius Lyon | Michigan 1-5 | Michigan 6 | Michigan 7 | Michigan 8 | Michigan 9 | Michigan 19 | Michigan 11 | Michigan 12 | Michigan 13 | Michigan 14 | Michigan 15 | Michigan 16 | Michigan 17 |Indian Doctor | Reminiscences | 1787 | Questions | Settlement | Yerks
image