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French in Michigan

French Settlements

Quarries were also worked before 1749, and probably very much earlier, at Monguagon and Stony Island. In 1763 there were several lime-kilns within the present limits of Detroit, and not only stone foundations but stone buildings existed in the settlement. During the siege of Detroit, one stone building, which must have been quite old, was demolished for the sake of the stone to be used for other purposes.
As Detroit was the only place where there were any land grants (except a small settlement at the Saut de Ste. Marie, in the latter days of French dominion) most of our information concerning the doings of the French, aside from hunting and trading, are derived from that point.
Agriculture was carried on profitably, and supplies were exported quite early from that settlement, consisting chiefly of corn and wheat, and possibly beans and peas. Cattle, horses and swine were raised in considerable numbers, but salt was so expensive that very little, if any, meat was salted for sale. Salt springs were known near lake St. Clair and on the river Rouge, and some salt was boiled in both places, but not probably such as would have been available for packing.

Early Michigan


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