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HISTORY OF THE MICHIGAN FEMALE COLLEGE

AND A SKETCH OF THE LIFE AND WORK OF MISS A. C. ROGERS BY MRS. ELIZA C. SMITH, 1883

The building was completed and occupied in the fall of 1858. All the subscription available under +he conditions, had been called in for the building. For its furnishing and internal preparations for comfort, the private means of the Misses Rogers were required. With that spirit of friendly cordiality and helpfulness so characteristic of new communities, and of which, at least in its outward manifestations, an increase of wealth and comfort seems so destructive, the ladies of Lansing came together, and by the pleasant lightening of labor made by many hands, fitted and sewed the carpets for all the rooms in the building. Prom the first, the school was filled to its capacity, and had the purpose of the founders been merely to build up a succesful school for girls, satisfactory pecuniary returns might have rewarded their efforts. But they were always looking forward to the ultimate end they had in view—the building up of an institution which should afford to young women the advantages of a collegiate course. Expenses looking toward this end were constantly increased, that absorbed not only the earnings of the school, but the private means of its founders. Efforts were made at the session of the legislature of 1867 to induce the State to accept the beginning that had been made, as a nucleus for a female college. The effort, though at first somewhat promising, was unsuccessful, and was not again repeated. Miss Rogers did not live to see the accomplishment of the object she had first had in view when she engaged in the agitation of the subject of the higher education for women, viz.: the opening to them of the State University, and had she foreseen how soon this was to follow, it is doubtful whether it would have satisfied her wishes. In the years of thought she had given to the subject, and with her constantly increasing experience of the needs and dangers of those critical, all-important years, her views on the subject of co-education had become modified, and she latterly greatly preferred separate education " for the sexes. To the last it was the dream of her life, and her strongest hope, that some man of fortune and liberality might be moved to so bestow his wealth as to make Michigan famous, as Massachusetts and New York are, for their magnificently endowed colleges for women.

MICHIGAN HISTORY


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