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HISTORY OF THE MICHIGAN FEMALE COLLEGE

AND A SKETCH OF THE LIFE AND WORK OF MISS A. C. ROGERS BY MRS. ELIZA C. SMITH, 1883

The conjunction of the two is, fortunately, not so rare as it once was, and it does not now awaken our repugnance to a woman to hear that she has a masculine mind. Should this intellect, however, be subjected to an exclusively masculine training, and all the feminine graces of character and manner be neglected; the gift of helpfulness, and the beautifying touch ignored, that should rightfully be. educated in every girl's hands as conscientiously as her mind is trained, we must own that society, the family, and woman herself are defrauded, and the vaunted higher education for women but a doubtful

. Miss Rogers in her own person exemplified the combination of refined womanly tastes and occupations with more active and public pursuits, and found pleasure in a life of study and thought attractive to an earnest mind irrespective of sex. The work of her needle was as fine as' her * beautiful penmanship, and her love of order and tasteful arrangement of her home were as noticeable as the thoroughness in her teaching and school discipline. It was not enough that the young ladies under her care should be proficient in mathematics—they must learn the use of the needle if hitherto neglected; not enough that their exercises in French and German were well prepared— their own rooms must be in a condition of order and neatness to make them fearless of inspection. Conversation they were taught to regard not merely as idle talk, but as a gift especially desirable for women, to be cultivated, and carefully improved. In a word, she aimed to develop her girls in the many-sided way which a woman's after life is sure to make necessary.
Of her religious life it would be impossible to speak apart from her regular daily life and work, since it was all permeated with the same deep and abiding principle of love for God the Father, and for men his children. Herself from early life a member of the Methodist church, she inquired after no one's creed, or inward convictions. In her view all the roads tended toward the same end, and the weariness and hardness of the way demanded of each traveler all possible forbearance and helpfulness, with no small suspicions or cavilings. The summons to that unseen world which in hours of suffering had often seemed to draw very near came at last suddenly, and without warning. Few indeed may hope to find there such a record of good deeds done without ostentation, or self righteousness, or hope of reward—and of no one could it ever have been more truthfully said, in regard to the employment of talents, means, and opportunities for usefulness, "She has done what she could. "

MICHIGAN HISTORY


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