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A HISTORY OF THE PRESS OF MICHIGAN

PREPARED FOR THE CENTENNIAL BY ORDER OF GOV. JOHN J. BAGLEY TOM S. APPLEGATE, COMPILER
Section II


KENT COUNTY
This county has a population of 62, 671, and is supplied with three daily papers, nine weekly, and one semi-weekly. The Eagle, The Democrat, and The Times, Grand Rapids, issue both daily and weekly editions. The Post is a semi-weekly. The Michigan. Staats Zeitung is a German paper, and The Vrijheids Banier. and De Standaard, both Holland papers. These are all printed at Grand Rapids. The Journal, a weekly paper, is printed at Lowell. The Clipper, also a weekly paper, is printed at Cedar Springs, and the Register, also a weekly, at Rockford.
The compiler is indebted for much of the valuable information which follows, to Mr. Albert Baxter, editor of the Grand Rapids Eagle: The first newspaper printed in Kent county was called the Grand River-Times, and was started by George W. Pattison, in 1837, and the first number published April 18th, of that year. The press on which this paper was printed was drawn up the river from Grand Haven, on the ice, by a team of dogs. It was purchased the winter previous at Buffalo. At Detroit it was shipped to Grand Haven on the steamer Don Quixote, which was wrecked off Thunder Bay, and the press taken around the lakes on another boat. The paper was politically neutral, and open for both whig and democratic articles. The writers for the Democratic side were from time to time, Simeon M. Johnson, Charles H. Taylor, Sylvester Granger, and Charles I. Walker; for the whig side, George Martin, Wm. G. Henry, E. B. Bostwick, and T. W. Higginson. Noble H. Pinney assisted as editor at first. James H. Morse had an interest in it for a time. In May, 1841, it passed into the hands "of Morse and Simeon M. Johnson, and the latter as editor, being a great admirer of the Richmond paper of that name, changed its name to The Inquirer. In 1843, E. D. Burr became a partner, and it hoisted the democratic flag, with John C. Calhoun for president. The following year it supported Polk, and a campaign sheet was issued in connection with it, called Young Hickory. About 1845, Jacob Barns, for Mrs. Stevens, became its manager, and a few years later it was purchased by Taylor and Barns (C. H. Taylor and Jacob Barns), who published it till 1857. Thomas B. Church was its editor for some years, from about 1845 to 1850.

THE PRESS OF MICHIGAN


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