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A HISTORY OF THE PRESS OF MICHIGAN

PREPARED FOR THE CENTENNIAL BY ORDER OF GOV. JOHN J. BAGLEY TOM S. APPLEGATE, COMPILER
Section I

The Advertiser and The Tribune were consolidated, under the name of The Advertiser and Tribune, the proprietorship taking the form of a corporation, with Henry Barnes, of The Tribune, as editor, and James E. Scripps, of The Advertiser, as business manager, its general affairs being regulated by a Board of five directors, elected annually. On July 18th, 1863, a weekly political sheet. The Free Union, was established by Mr. F. B. Porter, but in 1864 it also was purchased by The Advertiser and Tribune Company, making the sixth journal of which The Advertiser and Tribune is to-day the living representative. It has, since the last consolidation, continued to exist as a corporation, having five directors, and the usual corporate officers. For several years Henry Barnes continued editor-in-chief, being succeeded by James F. Conover, who was in turn succeeded by Charles K. Backus. The general management of the ¦business of the concern remained with Mr. Scripps until 1873, when he resigned, and was succeeded by Henry E. Baker, the present incumbent of this responsible position. When the whig party passed out of existence, and the republican party was organized, both The Tribune and The Advertiser supported the new movement, and the consolidated Advertiser and Tribune has always been a steady advocate of the principles enunciated and maintained by the republican party. The histories of the journals which have gone to make up the present Advertiser and Tribune illustrate very well the history and growth of the State and of Michigan journalism. From insignificant beginnings, and supported only by small frontier settlement some forty years ago, the little newspaper of twenty-four small columns, has developed into a metropolitan journal, supported by a rich and powerful State. Even in 1841, when George Dawson "bought an interest in the Advertiser, the paper was sold for $5, 000; its weekly circulation amounted to only 2,000 copies, when put upon a cash basis, and its daily edition counted hardly 400 sales.

MICHIGAN PRESS


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