image
image

image
image
 

HISTORY OF HORTICULTURE IN MICHIGAN

BY J. C. HOLIES, OF DETROIT

Some years since, as I was passing through the orchard of Mr. Francis Baby, of Windsor, Canada, for the purpose of getting specimens of apples for exhibition, I noticed a very handsome, bright red apple, at that date, September, not ripe. Its name Mr. Baby did not know. Mr. James Dougall, son-in-law of Mr. Baby, and a near neighbor, who was well acquainted with the orchard, had never noticed this tree or its fruit, so we concluded to wait until it was ripe, then take another look. A short time afterward I received from Mr. Dougall specimens of this fruit, accompanied by a note in which he says: "Mr. Baby informs me that he received the original trees, which are yet standing, and from which I took the specimens I send you, from Montreal, in 1796, along with other kinds, and he thinks it had no particular name, but says it is one of the Calvilles. Captain Cowan, who commanded a small vessel on the lakes, and who had formerly been a gardener to Gen. Washington previous to his being president, brought up the trees in his vessel for Mr. Baby from Fort Erie, and as he was an excellent grafter, he took scions from each variety received by Mr. Baby for the purpose of engrafting them into trees in Detroit. I find some of the specimens of fruit are very good, while others from the same tree are very inferior. Some of the fruit is stained red to the core, and some specimens are white throughout. The specimens with stained flesh are always the best. This remark holds good as against the red Calville and the Rosseau, which apples belong to the same class. " In the Baby orchard, among the trees brought from Montreal in 179G, were the Snow, Calville, Pomme Gris and other apples that were leading varieties in the orchards in Canada. I afterwards found this handsome but nameless apple in some of the orchards on Grosse Isle, under the name of Bourassa. The only work in which I find the Bourassa apple mentioned is J. J. Thomas' Fruit Culturist. The apple of which I am speaking does not correspond with his description.

HORTICULTURE


Page 3


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
 






If you find this information helpful please consider making a donation
Thank you
Thank you



image
image
image

Site Map | Chapter Index | MICHIGAN
State College | Alpena 2 3|Branch County | Quincy | Calhoun County | Eaton County | Detroit 1820 | Detroit 1838 | Grand Blanc | Indians | Water town | Misc|Michigan 1820 | Hillsdale College 2 | Horticulture |
image