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DETROIT IN 1838

BY HENRY A. FORD

The whole state had but sixty eight mail routes, only three of these directly reaching Detroit. The larger lake steamers, of 250 to 472 tons, numbered but nineteen, and the largest yet launched upon these inland seas was the "Illinois, " of 755 tons, built here. The entire tonnage owned in the Detroit district in 1837 was but 6, 994, against 995 in 1830. The industries of the State were as yet light and comparatively unimportant. The estimated value of the agricultural product of 1837, based in part upon the census of that year, gave $2, 114, 366 for 1, 691, 499 bushels of wheat; $1, 163, 446 for oats; $1, 319, 045 for corn and $36, 573 for rye; making a total of $4, 633, 430. Neat stock was estimated at $4, 480, 500; horses, $1, 405, -800; hogs, $1, 636, 425; sheep, $95, 515; total, $7, 617, 240. Mining had hardly yet begun. The Clinton salt works were going; Mt. Clemens had a glass factory and was doing a little ship building. Incomplete census returns in November, 1837, exhibited 433 saw mills, 114 grist mills, 23 carding machines, 12 cloth dressing establishments and 16 distilleries. The vast industrial development of Michigan was yet mainly in the future. Wayne county at this time had 23, 400 people, being little more populous than Washtenaw with 21, 817 and Oakland with 20, 163; but apart from Lenawee, which had 14, 540, it had more than twice as many as any other ia the state.

DETROIT MICHIGAN


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