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DETROIT IN 1838

BY HENRY A. FORD

It was evening of the next day before the devious windings of the little river had been traversed for a few miles, and the destined point reached. Here, among much excellent forest, the diarist noted "wild cherry trees, which had a fine red wood, of which in Detroit the most beautiful cabinet work is made. The place was evidently the site of an old Indian town, of which many corn holes and other indications were observed. Religious services were held the same evening around the bivouac fire, for which the Moravian text of the day seemed specially fitting: ''For ye shall go out with joy and be led forth with peace. " Tents were pitched, but in a few days huts were erected, which in due time became substantial cabins. Only two rows were built, one on each side of a street, "full four rods wide, " each lot having a front of three rods or fifty feet, very nearly. Accounts-vary as to the number ultimately erected, from twenty to thirty. A rude chapel, not much larger than the other buildings, was first occupied on the 5th of November. There was no blockhouse or stockade, but the little church was slightly fortified. This Moravian station appears to have existed during several months of its short life, without a name. It is not mentioned by Zeisberger by the favorite name of Gnadenhutten until Wept. 4, 1783, and it was not until Loskiel wrote his history of the Moravian missions that it received the designation by which it has since been known as New Gnadenhutten. The settlement was founded under auspices that well entitled it to be called "Tents of Grace. " Everybody at first was kind. Major De Peyster had supplied the infant colony with unusual liberality.

DETROIT MICHIGAN


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