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DETROIT IN 1838

BY HENRY A. FORD

He was an illiterate man, and his relation is full of blunders. Other narratives given late in life by St. Anbin, Guoin, Mr. Meloche. and others are evidently affected by the romance with which old age will clothe the simplest occurrence of early days. In the total absence of any documentary evidence or contemporary statement it must lie held that the story grew to its present proportions and brilliancy from the mere suspicions of Pontiac and his brutal punishment of the Indian girl which subsequently in the legends of the prisoners and the savages received its variegated embellishments, that have lost nothing at the hands of successive historians. Mrs. Sheldon in her history of Michigan says that a. soldier at the fort named William Tucker, who during captivity among the Indians had been adopted into a tribe, learned the designs of Pontiac from his savage sister and disclosed them to Gladwyn. This is very likely the correct version of the affair and the soldier's "sister" may plausibly enough have been the woman scourged by the haughty Pontiac. —Detroit Tribune.
THE OLD MORAVIAN MISSION AT MT. CLEMENS
BY HENRY A. FORD
One of the most obscure episodes in the annals of the northwest, so little noted that Judge Cooley's recent history of Michigan (in the "American Commonwealth, " series) has not the least reference to it, is yet fraught with the highest interest to the reader of heroic and daring deeds, undertaken for civilization and Christianity.

DETROIT MICHIGAN


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