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THE OLD MEMBERS OF THE CALHOUN AND KALAMAZOO COUNTY BARS

BY A. D. P. VAN BUREN

One day while he was searching for new reading matter among the papers, he discovered that the bottom of the trunk was covered with silver dollars—bogus dollars, that had been struck off, but had not yet been milled. He quietly slipped two into his pocket, and, putting the papers back in the trunk, closed it and went to his work. The next day he consulted Daniel B. Eldred of Climax. The result was that constable Ira Case was soon equipped with the proper papers and search was made on Harrison's premises, which led to the discovery of all the tools and implements for making bogus money. And to the astonishment of the people in central Michigan, John Grove Bean, deputy sheriff of Calhoun county, a well known and highly respected citizen of Marshall, was arrested as the head of this1 gang of counterfeiters. He was ?After the trial Van Arman said to Justice Lay, "When we lawyers, 'fog up' a point of law, and you can't see your way clear, just cling to the common sense of the case and you'll come out right. " tried, found guilty and served his sentence out in the state penitentiary. Harrison, on the alert, escaped to the western country. Van Annan, I think was on the side of the prosecution, in this trial.
As a proof of Van Annan's high standing as a lawyer we have only to refer to the celebrated cases, in Michigan, in which he has been leading counsel. In the celebrated railroad conspiracy case, he represented the Michigan Central railroad against Abel Fitch. Mr. Fitch had secured William H. Seward for his counsel. This was a long trial, and drew the attention of the whole country, from the eminence of the counsel engaged in it, and for the great importance attached to the charges brought against the defendant, Abel Fitch. It is not too much to say that it was the masterly manner and great ability he displayed in conducting the prosecution that won this case for his clients. William H. Seward said that Van Annan's final speech on this trial was one of the ablest forensic efforts of the day. He was counsel in the noted trial of White and Ulum for the murder of Estabrook, which was held at Centerville. He was also counsel for Vanderpool in his trial at Kalamazoo, where he was acquitted. Since he has lived in Chicago he has added still fresh laurels to his fame as a great lawyer. But his declining health has,, within a few years, interfered much with his legal practice.

Michigan


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