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They hitched the seven yokes of cattle to the end of the wagon tongue, which brought those in front on hard ground. By this means our wagons were soon brought out. It was now quite late, but we were soon loaded up and on the move again, and reached the Grass Lake House between ten and eleven o'clock that night, very much fatigued. After taking some refreshments we retired to rest, and when the morning light dawned upon us, we found that' nature's sweet restorer, balmy sleep,' had restored us to our wonted vigor. We set out on our journey again with new courage, but before nine o'clock we found ourselves stationary in the mud again, and had to go half a mile for assistance. With the assistance obtained, we were soon on terra firma, and by twelve o'clock reached the small village of Jacksonburg, and put up at a hotel kept by a man by the name of Blackman. Here we were treated very kindly, and regaled ourselves with green peas and new potatoes, the first of the season for us, which was quite a treat. Our next obstruction was Sandstone creek, which was not bridged. We had to drive into the creek and then follow up-stream a considerable distance before we could effect a crossing. We staid that night at Roberts' tavern, and the next day took dinner at Blashfield's tavern, situated in a very pleasant place. If I remember rightly, there were but three houses between Jackson and Marengo. We intended to camp out that night, as we considered the distance too great to drive, through.

Michigan


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