image
image

image
image
 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF JUDGE BAZIL HARRISON

BY A. D. P. VAN BUREN

But he seems to have been one of those characters, so frequently found in great families, who are never successful. He was, so far as we are able to learn, of good habits and industrious, but as his grandson (who remembers him well) said to the writer, "he never got ahead. He farmed it all his life, yet never owned a farm. " If however, he did not render so great services to his country as his illustrious brother, he did not live in vain and was not lacking in patriotic endeavor. Of his twenty-three children sixteen attained their majority and Judge Harrison has several times described to us with pride and enthusiasm the departure of six of his older brothers for Washington's army. It must have been in the year of 1778, perhaps just after Clinton's defeat at Monmouth had kindled the hopes of patriots, or the inhuman massacre, by Butler's savages, at Wyoming, had aroused their indignation and fears and the father's address to his sons was worthy of a sire of Rome or Sparta. "Boys, " said he to his six stalwart grown sons, "I cannot go into the army myself, I am too old, and must remain to care for mother and the younger children. But I will look after the farm and raise the corn while you are gone. We must not let the British get a foothold in this country. We had better all die than do that. Go and fight for your country and follow where Washington leads, and may God bless and keep you. " As the old Judge last summer described to us this scene, there was something of youthful fire in his half dimmed eyes, and his voice strengthened as he related this event of nearly a hundred years ago. It evidently made an impression on his youthful mind never to be effaced. "Oh yes, I remember well, " said he, "we all helped them to put on their guns and swords, and I saw them march away together, just at daylight, to light under Washington. " And then he related some of their narrow escapes and spoke of wounds they had received how "Kinzie had a bullet in his neck" which he would never have extracted, but carried with him to his grave this souvenir of battle.

Michigan


Page 2


 


image



Please consider making a donation to help offset expenses to keep this site online.
Thank you



image
image
image

Site Map | Chapter Index | MICHIGAN
Counties | Towns | The Blackhawk War | Southwestern michigan | Early Recollections | | Bagley | Eldorado | New Life | Navarre
Maxwell | Territorial Road| Pioneer Life | Battle Creek | Stebbins | William Burt | Pilcher | Chase | Lamb
image