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A HISTORY OF THE ASYLUMS FOR THE INSANE IN MICHIGAN

BY HENRY M. HURD, M. D.

If, however, the circumstances of the patient or of his friends did not permit such an outlay, a legal provision was made for' the admission of dependent patients upon the order of the judge of probate and the payment of the expenses of treatment by the county of his residence. Pauper patients—that is those who were wholly dependent upon public charity—were to be admitted at the request and under the orders of the superintendents of the county poor. It may be mentioned as illustrating the wisdom of this act of organization, that no material modification has been made in it from 1859 until the present time. The right to send pauper patients however has been transferred from the superintendents of the poor to the judge of probate.
The same legislature also appropriated the sum of $90,500 to complete the asylum and to prepare it for the admission of patients. Preparations were accordingly made for the immediate opening of one wing of the asylum for ninety patients. Owing, however, to certain unforeseen delays in the payment of an appropriation, due to the defalcation of the State treasurer, it was found impracticable to negotiate the state warrants and to raise sufficient money to defray the current expenses of the asylum so that it might be opened prior to August 29, 1859. One patient, however, was received upon the 23d day of April. It is interesting to recall that she belonged to the family whose unfortunate condition had given rise to the movement to build an asylum for the insane eleven years before.

MICHIGAN ASYLUMS


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