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Michigan

Abel Bingham

Early Sabbath morning, September llth, the British fleet appeared off Cumberland Head, came within good fighting distance of our fleet and dropped anchor. After a sharp contest of two hours the British flag came down. While this was occurring, the British sent a large division across the Saranac river to storm the fort. A spirited resistance was made by Lieutenant Bingham's detachment, which, being compelled to retire, he was successful in conducting the enemy from the fort. The British bugle just then sounded a retreat; but one of their flanks, not hearing the signal, marched on. Another engagement ensued, during, which he received a wound in the forehead. He was taken up for dead, and as he was carried off the field he heard several say, " Lieutenant Bingham is killed." The wound proved a serious one, the skull being fractured; but he was conveyed ', to a house near by, where it was dressed and he returned almost immediately to the scene of action. Afterwards, when relating this incident to a party of friends, one gentleman listening intently, exclaimed. " Did it kill you ?" General Scott also, when dining at his table remarked, noticing the wound, " Well, Mr. Bingham, you had your face the right way."

Early Michigan Preachers


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