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Michigan

Abel Bingham

We sat down under a shade tree and conversed freely for a long time. When I closed my remarks, as I had addressed him by the appellation of "Father," he said, "My son, I am truly thankful for the very friendly talk we have had at this time; it has made a solemn impres-sion on my mind." Mr. Bingham had now been with them more than six years. He had buried two children, and his own health was seriously impaired, as it was a sickly location; he therefore felt he must close his labors among them. The Indians made great progress in education under his instruc- tion, some of them attaining eminence. He had established the mission on a thorough basis; the church had quite a large membership, the school was in a flourishing condition, and all visitors were astonished at the progress and appearance of the scholars—Eli Stone Parker, of Gen. Grant's staff, being one of them, Mr. B. having given him this Christian name. The women received instruction in domestic work, from Mrs. B., and Mr. B. had also established the right of civil marriage among them. The Indians had made great improvement in agriculture during his labors there; taught them how to cultivate the land, sow wheat, and raise good crops.

Early Michigan Preachers


Page 18


 






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