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Michigan

Abel Bingham

Even Red Jacket, his most persistent enemy, became a warm friend. He was fairly won over, and expressed himself fully in favor of schools for the education of their children, and instruc-tion in the English language, as the following incident will show: " One day, in the summer of 1827, I met Red Jacket on the street, and, after the usual salutations, informed him I wished to converse on the subject of religion. With his usual adroitness, he intimated I was moving in an ordinary circle, having charge of only a small mission, while he was a principal chief of the Seneca Nation; had traveled extensively, visited many cities, been six times to Washington, and also visited Europe, leaving me to infer that he could not receive instruction from me. I said, I do not wish to talk with you about Washington, but of your soul, death, judgment and eternity. I know you are a great man in your nation, and -you have a great mind, but you are an old man (now sixty), and must ' Boon die. I thought I could speak with you on this subject, and not offend you.

Early Michigan Preachers


Page 17


 


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